Posts Tagged ‘work’

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  • Tell us about yourself?

I think it’s the most difficult question as still, I need to know a lot about myself. I belong to a middle-class family brought up by decent parents and I am grateful to them. I completed my primary from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. At a young age left for Pakistan and completed my Medical training as a doctor.  My first write-up was rather an opinion for how to keep city clean which came out in Dawn’s Young World. After that was busy in studies. I started writing again though with fits and starts from 2013

  • Why did you choose to write poetry?

I think it’s like poetry chose me, this genre of writing was new for me too and u will be surprised to know that I have lots of books which adorn my shelf and borrowed from friends too but none is the book of poetry. Though if I was reading poetry as part of my grade course I would be mesmerized with words.

  • When did you start working on your book?

I was writing mainly for relaxation just to vent out my feelings but credit for it goes to some of my colleagues who after reading my poems so much liked it that they encouraged me to go for a compilation of my writings and that’s how it came in my mind. I submitted poems in two competitions for one I was selected among commendable writers. I then compiled and sent a rough draft around April 2016 and there was no looking back.

  • Who are you currently reading?

I am currently reading the book version of  “Miss Peregrine’s Home for The Peculiar Children” penned by Ransom Riggs. It’s a light fantasy read.

  • How do you manage to write with your profession keeping you busy?

I think it’s a lot about prioritising. As my profession takes up a lot of my time. I feel for some poetry is practiced and learned but for me, its borne out of situations I see, feel or experience so I cannot particularly slot time that this time is for writing poetry. It depends on my mood.

  • Tell us about your upcoming book?

My upcoming book is “Reneging Quiescence”, the concoction of different experiences and common message in one way or other and that is a refusal to be silenced by wrong things. Sometimes we are aggressive in certain situations to criticise but where we can really help we just turn a blind eye.

  • What are your plans for this book?

I hope this book is able to reach out to maximum readers out there and also help those who are not voracious readers but can read it to get an inspiration. It will be released on Amazon and Kindle first, and then as a paperback.

  • Why do you think the culture of book reading declining in Pakistan?

There are obvious reasons like education being too much expensive so increase in illiteracy, from childhood not encouraged to read books, different aspects of social media like the net ,- television to keep families occupied so no one interested. Book fairs are being arranged in Karachi where a lot of old books exchanged but usually fewer crowds are willing to stand beneath the sun to buy books.

  • Do you prefer E-book or Paperback?

For me, the magic of Paper book cannot be compared with an Ebook ever. At Least for now and maybe in the future. Sitting on the computer for a long time is also damaging for eyes, your posture also.

  • As a writer and a poet, what is your message to the world?

My message to the world is happy it’s your right as long as it doesn’t hurt anyone. Don’t stop dreaming. Be good where every where there seems to be so much rush its like time has bought us.

N remember as I said before AS WE LABEL THE SKY SO WE SET ITS LIMITS.

I want to thank Irum CEO of the publishing house and an  author in her right for asking me for her blog interview.

You can buy her book by placing an order here: beyondsanitybooks@gmail.com

Know more about her Here.

Know about Beyond Sanity Publishing 

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STOCKHOLM, Oct 13 (Reuters) – Bob Dylan, regarded as the voice of a generation for his influential songs from the 1960s onwards, has won the Nobel Prize for Literature in a surprise decision that made him the only singer-songwriter to win the award.

The 75-year-old Dylan – who won the prize for “having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition” – now finds himself in the company of Winston Churchill, Thomas Mann and Rudyard Kipling as Nobel laureates.

The announcement was met with gasps in Stockholm’s stately Royal Academy hall, followed – unusually – by some laughter.

Dylan’s songs, such as “Blowin’ in the Wind,” “The Times They Are a-Changin’,” “Subterranean Homesick Blues” and “Like a Rolling Stone” captured a spirit of rebellion, dissent and independence.

More than 50 years on, Dylan is still writing songs and is often on tour, performing his dense poetic lyrics, sung in a sometimes rasping voice that has been ridiculed by detractors.

Some lyrics have resonated for decades.

“Blowin’ in the Wind,” written in 1962, was considered one of the most eloquent folk songs of all time. “The Times They Are A-Changin’,” in which Dylan told Americans “your sons and your daughters are beyond your command,” was an anthem of the civil rights movement and Vietnam War protests.

Awarding the 8 million Swedish crown ($930,000) prize, the Swedish Academy said: “Dylan has the status of an icon. His influence on contemporary music is profound.”

Swedish Academy member Per Wastberg said: “He is probably the greatest living poet.”

Asked if he thought Dylan’s Nobel lecture – traditionally given by the laureate in Stockholm later in the year – would be a concert, replied: “Let’s hope so.”

Over the years, not everyone has agreed that Dylan was a poet of the first order. Novelist Norman Mailer countered: “If Dylan’s a poet, I’m a basketball player.”

Sara Danius, Permanent Secretary of the Nobel Academy, told a news conference there was “great unity” in the panel’s decision to give Dylan the prize.

Dylan has always been an enigmatic figure. He went into seclusion for months after a motorcycle crash in 1966, leading to stories that he had cracked under the pressure of his new celebrity.

He was born into a Jewish family but in the late 1970s converted to born-again Christianity and later said he followed no organized religion. At another point in his life, Dylan took up boxing.

Dylan’s spokesman, Elliott Mintz, declined immediate comment when reached by phone, citing the early hour in Los Angeles, where it was 3 a.m. at the time of the announcement. Dylan was due to give a concert in Las Vegas on Thursday evening.

Literature was the last of this year’s Nobel prizes to be awarded. The prize is named after dynamite inventor Alfred Nobel and has been awarded since 1901 for achievements in science, literature and peace in accordance with his will. 

Article by The Huffington Post. Read it Here

We Rise By Lifting Others !!

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The Students of Fatima Jinnah women university took the initiative to renovate Umeed.e.Noor school for special children with the collaboration of Josh.e.Junoon, to add colors and Vibrancy to their stagnant lives.
Ceremony chaired by Mrs. Fauzia Kasuri with a lot of other prominent social workers of Islamabad.
Thanks Ms. Anjum Anwar, Mrs Farah Agha, Mr Qarib Kazmi, Mr Tariq Khan, Mr Rameez, Ms.Neelam Torou for joining us and supporting us.

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We are so thankful to every donor, contributor & Volunteer for helping us in this project. May Allah pak Bless u all Ameen.
Appreciation certificates & Outstanding performance certificates were presented to every member who done their best efforts for this project.
Team Josh.e.Junoon also awarded Mrs. Fauzia Kasuri with title of Lady of Humanity in recognition of her tireless efforts for serving the humanity.We also Awarded Mr. Rameez Mumtaz with Award of Appreciation for his services for the humanity.

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Media Coverage by: 92HD, Samaa, Capital TV, Dawn News, Rose News

Total kids living at Umeed.e.Noor: 15

Day Scholars: 72

For donations and details, visit Josh.e.Junoon